• Deportation Memorial and Museum at Hollerich Station
Since 1996, a memorial in the building of the former Luxembourg-Hollerich railway station has commemorated the deportations from the station to the German Reich, which took place between October 1942 and July 1944.
Image: Luxembourg-Hollerich, September 1942, Deportees at the railway station, Archiv Musée National de la Résistance
Luxembourg-Hollerich, September 1942, Deportees at the railway station, Archiv Musée National de la Résistance

Image: Luxembourg-Hollerich, undated, The former railway station, Mémorial de la Déportation
Luxembourg-Hollerich, undated, The former railway station, Mémorial de la Déportation
On May 10, 1940, the German Wehrmacht invaded neutral Luxembourg and occupied the country. Adolf Hitler appointed Gustav Simon, the Gau leader of the Koblenz-Trier region, as the new civil administrator of Luxembourg. The occupiers soon began persecuting the Jews. The first deportation train carrying Jews departed from Luxemburg's main station in October 1941 - it was bound for the Łódź ghetto. Prior to their deportation, Jews were assembled at the Pafemillen (German: Fünfbrunnen) monastery in the north of the country. Until June 1943, six further transports followed to ghettos and concentration camps in occupied Eastern Europe.
In August 1942, Simon introduced the general conscription of men in Luxembourg - by then, Luxembourg had been incorporated into the German Reich. Although the local population protested against these measures, about 11,200 men were drafted for labour service or into the Wehrmacht in the years that followed. Simon had the demonstrations violently suppressed; the conscripts were subsequently transported from the Hollerich station to the east.
Image: Luxembourg-Hollerich, September 1942, Deportees at the railway station, Archiv Musée National de la Résistance
Luxembourg-Hollerich, September 1942, Deportees at the railway station, Archiv Musée National de la Résistance

Image: Luxembourg-Hollerich, undated, The former railway station, Mémorial de la Déportation
Luxembourg-Hollerich, undated, The former railway station, Mémorial de la Déportation
Of the 11,200 Luxembourgers forcibly drafted for the Wehrmacht and labour service, over 2,700 did not return. 3,600 Luxembourgian girls were drafted for labour service; 60 of them perished. Beginning 1942, over 4,100 men, women and children were forcibly resettled from Luxembourg to eastern provinces of Germany, about 73 of them died.
Image: Luxembourg-Hollerich, September 1942, Deportees boarding a train, Marie-Madeleine Schiltges
Luxembourg-Hollerich, September 1942, Deportees boarding a train, Marie-Madeleine Schiltges

Image: Luxembourg-Hollerich, 2006, View of the exhibit on the deportation of the Luxembourg Jews, Andreas Pflock
Luxembourg-Hollerich, 2006, View of the exhibit on the deportation of the Luxembourg Jews, Andreas Pflock
The Deportation Memorial was opened in the former Luxembourg-Hollerich railway station in 1996. The memorial contains a permanent exhibition. A memorial to those deported from Luxembourg was erected close-by.
Image: Luxembourg-Hollerich, 2005, Memorial to the deportees, Andreas Pflock
Luxembourg-Hollerich, 2005, Memorial to the deportees, Andreas Pflock

Name
Mémorial de la Déportation Gare Hollerich
Address
3 A, rue de la Déportation
1415 Stad Lëtzebuerg
Phone
+ 352(0) 2478 819 1
Fax
+ 352(0) 2487 304 3
Web
http://www.secondeguerremondiale.public.lu/fr/musees/occupation-resistance-enrolement-force/hollerich.html
E-Mail
secretariat@cdref.etat.lu
Open
Monday to Thursday: 9 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. or by appointment. Closed on holidays.
Possibilities
Memorial, exhibition, film archive and screening room, library